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Bug population rises as temperatures intensify

These insects may bring more birds to the area as they look for a food source. They’ll also...
These insects may bring more birds to the area as they look for a food source. They’ll also attract more fish and bigger bugs.(WIFR)
Published: May. 12, 2022 at 5:47 PM CDT
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ROCKFORD, Ill. (WIFR) - An earlier than normal blast of summer doesn’t just bring people out and about, it’s luring a lot of bugs from their hiding spaces.

“Warmer temperatures means a more active insect, and so that’s why you might be seeing more insects being active around this time of year especially during this heat wave,” said Stew Cook, educator at the Burpee Museum of Natural History.

Insects are invading the lives of Illinoisans in droves. Cook believes May’s record temperatures are responsible for the population explosion.

“The extra heat is actually gonna fast forward the reproductive cycle and so eggs are gonna mature faster and also the larvae forms are gonna mature faster so you have faster hatching insects and faster developing insects,” Cook told 23 News.

Jared Frank, owner of Ready Pest Control, says he’s already seeing an influx of calls.

“We’ve seen that recently, when it was colder weather we weren’t really seeing much change, but I think that really kind of made them explode as the weather warmed up,” Frank said.

These experts say a few simple steps can keep your personal spaces bug free, even as temperatures intensify:

“You can check your windows, make sure those are tight, that the rubber seals are still working correctly,” Frank said.

“Mosquitos and gnats are attracted to the carbon dioxide that we breathe out and so you obviously can’t stop breathing,” said Cook. “So that’s why we put bug spray on ourselves to kind of conceal ourselves so when they land on us they won’t be biting us”

These insects may bring more birds to the area as they look for a food source. They’ll also attract more fish and bigger bugs.

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