Study finds treating maternal blood pressure leads to better birth outcomes

Experts say the findings show that medicated mothers are less likely to develop serious conditions during pregnancy.
Published: Apr. 5, 2022 at 11:45 AM CDT
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MADISON, Wis. (WIFR) - Treating slightly elevated blood pressure in pregnant mothers can reduce the risk of birth complications, according to a new study involving UW Health researchers.

Experts say the findings show that medicated mothers are less likely to develop serious conditions like severe preeclampsia, placental abruption, death of the baby, or complications that would require inducing birth before 35 weeks gestation.

The study took place at 70 academic medical centers and included around 2,400 pregnant patients. Dr. Kara Hoppe, who led the Wisconsin sites of the study, said it may change guidelines on whether to treat women whose blood pressure is considered only mildly elevated.

“Knowing that women aren’t treated until they have severe blood pressures, which puts them at risk in their pregnancy, the ability to actually have evidence to say that treatment at a lower threshold is good, and also safe for the baby really is going to change the way we care for women,” said Dr. Hoppe, fetal-maternal medicine specialist at UW Health.

For more information about the Chronic Hypertension and Pregnancy (CHAP) study, please click here.

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