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AAA: 100 deadliest days for teen drivers have begun

More than 30 percent of deaths involving teen drivers occurs during what’s called the ’100 Deadliest Days.’
Nationwide, more than 30 percent of deaths involving teen drivers occurs during what’s called...
Nationwide, more than 30 percent of deaths involving teen drivers occurs during what’s called the “100 Deadliest Days” — a period that runs from Memorial Day to Labor Day.
Updated: Jun. 1, 2021 at 1:58 PM CDT
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ROCKFORD, Ill. (WIFR) - Memorial Day weekend marked the unofficial start of summer and unfortunately a dangerous time of year for young drivers.

Nationwide, more than 30 percent of deaths involving teen drivers occurs during what’s called the “100 Deadliest Days” — a period that runs from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

“Now that the CDC has lifted many pandemic restrictions, young adults are eager to reconnect with friends, which means young inexperienced drivers will spend more time on the roads,” Molly Hart, spokesperson for AAA – The Auto Club Group said. “This increases the chances that they’re involved in a crash, and for every mile driven, new teen drivers — ages 16 to 17-years-old — are three times more likely to be involved in a deadly crash compared to adults.”

Nationwide

  • Each year an average of 2,081 teen drivers are involved in fatal crashes; 636 of those — 30 percent — occurred during the 100 deadliest days
  • More than 7,038 people died in teen-related summertime crashes from 2010 to 2019.
  • That’s more than seven people a day each summer compared to the rest of the year — six people per day.

Illinois

  • An average 22 teen drivers are involved in fatal crashes during this time.
  • On average 76 people are killed in teen driver-related crashes every year; 19 of those occur during the 100 deadliest days.
  • 249 people were killed in teen driver-related crashes during the past 10 summers.

To learn more, contact DriverTraining2@acg.aaa.com or call (888) 222-7108.

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