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GOP and Clark County Recorder reach settlement in ballot observation lawsuit

In addition, the GOP will dismiss its appeal and lawsuit, according to the court filing.
In this Sept. 8, 2020 photo, voting booths are kept socially distant at the Chesterfield, N.H....
In this Sept. 8, 2020 photo, voting booths are kept socially distant at the Chesterfield, N.H. polling site. Democrats and Republicans are involved in hundreds of lawsuits across the country relating to the upcoming election. The lawsuits concern the core fundamentals of the American voting process, including how ballots are cast and counted.(Kristopher Radder/The Brattleboro Reformer via AP)
Published: Nov. 5, 2020 at 6:47 PM CST
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(CNN) -- Lawyers for the Trump campaign and Nevada Republican Party said they have reached a settlement with the Clark County Recorder that will allow for additional observation of the ballots in the key area that includes Las Vegas, according to a new court filing.

In a court filing, the Trump attorneys ask the appeals court for an additional seven days to file its briefs, giving them room to obtain the signatures of the intervening parties to the settlement.

“On Nov. 4, 2020, appellants and respondents Barbara Cegavske and Joseph Gloria were able to reach a settlement agreement,” according to the court filing.

Under the terms of the agreement, “The Registrar shall allow the public to have additional observation access to the ballot duplication in the Greystone Facility such that all tables where the duplication process is occurring shall be visible to public observers.”

In addition, the GOP will dismiss its appeal and lawsuit, according to the court filing.

Last week the Trump campaign and Nevada Republican Party challenged the signature-matching and verification process on absentee ballots conducted by computer in Clark County. A state court judge has already dismissed the lawsuit, but the Trump campaign appealed.

The Trump campaign claims that the computer signature matching wasn’t as stringent as human checks, and fraudulent ballots could have snuck through.

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