Final Presidential Debate: Romney, Obama Clash on Foreign Policy

FACT CHECK: Flunking geography, history

   WASHINGTON (AP) -- Voters didn't always get the straight goods when President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney made their case for foreign policy and national security leadership Monday night before their last super-sized audience of the campaign. A few of their detours into domestic issues were problematic too.

   Romney flubbed Middle East geography. Obama got Romney's record as Massachusetts governor wrong.

   At the same time, they injected a little more accuracy into two leading misstatements of the campaign: Romney's claim for months that Obama went around apologizing for America, and the president's assertion, going back to his State of the Union address in January, that the U.S. military's exit from Afghanistan will yield money to rebuild America.

   A look at some of their statements and how they compare with the facts:

   ROMNEY: "Mr. President, the reason I call it an apology tour is because you went to the Middle East and you flew to Egypt and to Saudi Arabia and to Turkey and Iraq. And by the way, you skipped Israel, our closest friend in the region, but you went to the other nations. And by the way, they noticed that you skipped Israel. And then in those nations, and on Arabic TV, you said that America had been dismissive and derisive. You said that on occasion America had dictated to other nations."

   OBAMA: "Nothing Gov. Romney just said is true, starting with this notion of me apologizing. This has been probably the biggest whopper that's been told during the course of this campaign. And every fact checker and every reporter who's looked at it, governor, has said this is not true."

   THE FACTS: Romney has indeed repeatedly and wrongly accused the president of traveling the world early in his presidency and apologizing for U.S. behavior. Obama didn't say "sorry" in those travels. But in this debate, Romney at last explained the context of his accusation: not that Obama apologized literally, but that he had been too deferential in his visits to Europe, Latin America and the Muslim world.

   Obama said while abroad that the U.S. acted "contrary to our traditions and ideals" in its treatment of terrorist suspects, that "America has too often been selective in its promotion of democracy," that the U.S. "certainly shares blame" for international economic turmoil and has sometimes "shown arrogance and been dismissive, even divisive" toward Europe. Yet he also praised America and its ideals.

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   OBAMA: "What I think the American people recognize is, after a decade of war, it's time to do some nation-building here at home. And what we can now do is free up some resources to, for example, put Americans back to work, especially our veterans, rebuilding our roads, our bridges, our schools."

   THE FACTS: If Romney's "apology tour" was a campaign whopper, so has been Obama's repeated claim that ending expensive wars meant the U.S. now has money to spend at home. There is no such peace dividend because the wars were financed largely by borrowing.

   Yet Obama, too, watched his words a little more carefully Monday night, with his milder suggestion that "some resources" are freed up. That's a more plausible point, if only because U.S. "resources" include the ability to continue to go deeper in debt, but for the purpose of fixing roads, bridges and the like, instead of for making war.

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   ROMNEY: "Syria is Iran's only ally in the Arab world. It's their route to the sea."

   THE FACTS:  Iran has a large southern coastline with access to the Persian Gulf and the Gulf of Oman. And it has no land border with Syria.

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   ROMNEY: Said that when he was Massachusetts governor, high-school students who graduated in the top quarter "got a four-year, tuition-free ride at any Massachusetts public institution of higher learning."

   OBAMA: "That happened before you came into office."

   ROMNEY: "That was actually mine, actually, Mr. President. You got that fact wrong."

   THE FACTS: Romney was right.  The John and Abigail Adams scholarship program began in 2004 when he was governor.

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   ROMNEY: "I said that we would provide guarantees, and that was what was able to allow these (auto) companies to go through bankruptcy, to come out of bankruptcy. Under no circumstance would I do anything other than to help this industry get on its feet. And the idea that has been suggested that I would liquidate the industry. Of course not. That's the height of silliness. I have never said I would liquidate the industry."

   OBAMA: "Gov. Romney, you keep on trying to airbrush history here. You were very clear that you would not provide government assistance to the U.S. auto companies, even if they went through bankruptcy. You said that they could get it in the private marketplace. That wasn't true. They would have gone through a liquidation."

   THE FACTS: It's true that Romney didn't preach liquidation of GM and Chrysler and that he saw his approach as a way to save the auto companies. But his was an improbable course. Opposing a government bailout, Romney instead favored private loans to finance the automakers' restructuring in bankruptcy court. His proposed government loan guarantees would only have come after the companies went through bankruptcy. At the time, however, both automakers were nearly out of cash and were bad credit risks. The banking system was in crisis and private money wasn't available. So without hefty government aid, the assets of both companies probably would have been sold in liquidation auctions.

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   ROMNEY on SYRIA: "What I'm afraid of is we've watched over the past year or so, first the president saying, `Well, we'll let the U.N. deal with it.' And Assad -- excuse me, Kofi Annan -- came in and said we're going to try to have a cease-fire. That didn't work. Then it went to the Russians and said, `Let's see if you can do something.' We should be playing the leadership role there."

   OBAMA: "We are playing the leadership role."

   THE FACTS: Under Obama, the United States has taken a lead in trying to organize Syria's splintered opposition, even if the U.S. isn't interested in military intervention or providing direct arms support to the rebels. The administration has organized dozens of meetings in Turkey and the Middle East aimed at rallying Syria's political groups and rebel formations to agree on a common vision for a democratic future after Syrian President Bashar Assad is defeated. And Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton brought dozens of nations together as part of the Friends of Syria group to combine aid efforts to Syria's opposition and help it win the support of as many as Syrians as possible. The U.S. also is involved in vetting recipients of military aid from America's Arab allies like Saudi Arabia and Qatar.

   Romney is partly right in pointing out Obama's failure to win U.N. support for international action in Syria. But the Friends of Syria group has helped bring in hundreds of millions of dollars in humanitarian aid and other forms of assistance to Syrian civilians and the political opposition.

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   OBAMA: "What I would not have had done was left 10,000 troops in Iraq that would tie us down. And that certainly would not help us in the Middle East."                THE FACTS: Obama was suggesting that he had never favored keeping U.S. troops in Iraq beyond the December 2011 withdrawal deadline that the Bush administration had negotiated with the Iraqi government. Actually, the Obama administration tried for many months to win Iraqi agreement to keeping several thousand American troops there beyond 2011 to continue training and advising the Iraqi armed forces. The talks broke down over a disagreement on legal immunity for U.S. troops.

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   ROMNEY: "We have an enormous trade imbalance with China, and it's worse this year than last year and it's worse last year than the year before."

   THE FACTS: That's true as far as it goes but the imbalance is far from unique to the Obama years. The U.S. has run a trade deficit with China since 1985 and the gap has widened nearly every year since. According to Chinese customs data, Beijing reported a $181.3 billion trade surplus with the United States in 2010. That grew to $202.3 billion last year. The surplus for the first nine months of this year was $161.9 billion, well ahead of the level at this point in 2011.

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   OBAMA: "You are familiar with jobs being shipped overseas because you invested in companies that were shipping jobs overseas. And, you know, that's your right. I mean, that's how our free market works."

   THE FACTS: Bain Capital, the private equity company that Romney ran from 1984 to 2001, did invest in several companies that shifted American jobs and operations from the U.S. to China and other foreign nations. In one instance in 1998, Bain bought a 10 percent investment stake in Global-Tech, a Hong Kong firm that used mainland Chinese factories to make toasters and other appliances for U.S. manufacturers that were phasing out American operations and jobs. Romney held full Bain partnership stakes in that deal before the firm sold its holding later that year. Bain also invested in several firms that outsourced to Mexico in the early 2000s, but by then Romney had begun shifting away from Bain to a role running the Winter Olympic Games in Salt Lake City. And in almost all of these cases, it remains unclear how much oversight Bain had in the overseas shifts. The Romney campaign has said that Romney's holdings were mostly passive in nature, particularly after he left the firm.

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   ROMNEY: "In the 2000 debates, there was no mention of terrorism."

   THE FACTS: There was passing mention of terrorism in the 2000 debates. In the Oct. 17, 2000, debate between Democrat Al Gore and Republican George W. Bush, Gore talked about his work in Congress to "deal with the problems of terrorism and these new weapons of mass destruction." And in the vice presidential debate, Democrat Joe Lieberman defended the Clinton administration's record of preparing the armed forces to "meet the threats of the new generation of tomorrow, of weapons of mass destruction, of ballistic missiles, terrorism, cyber warfare." Romney's larger point, that the U.S. did not anticipate anything on the scale of terrorist threat that existed, is supported by the light attention paid to the subject in the debates.
 

NEW: Romney backs Obama's Afghan drawdown plan

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- Republican Mitt Romney is backing President Barack Obama's plan to pull American troops out of Afghanistan by the end of 2014.

Romney says the Afghan troop surge that Obama ordered has been successful and a training program for Afghan forces is on track. As a result, he says the U.S. will be able to make a transition at the end of 2014 and make sure U.S. troops come home.

The Republican nominee has previously criticized Obama for setting a timeline for ending the war.

Obama tripled the number of U.S. troops in Afghanistan upon taking office. He has said the U.S. will maintain a civilian presence in Afghanistan after its military operations end.

DEBATE-APOLOGY

NEW: Obama rejects accusation of apologizing for US

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- President Barack Obama is pushing back on rival Mitt Romney's suggestion that the president has apologized for the United States on the world stage. Obama called the accusation the "biggest whopper" of the campaign.

The two men were sparring over foreign policy Monday in the final debate before Election Day.

Obama said he would not allow Iran to develop a nuclear weapon and had coordinated an international coalition to impose economic sanctions on Tehran. Obama said that under his presidency, the world is more united and Iran has been weakened.

Romney insisted Obama had apologized for the U.S., noting the president had given a speech in Egypt early in his term saying America had been "derisive" and at times had dictated to other nations.

DEBATE-IRAN

NEW: Obama: No scheduled meeting with Iran

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- President Barack Obama says published reports that the United States and Iran are planning to meet one-on-one after the election are "not true."

Obama made his denial during a presidential debate with Republican rival Mitt Romney.

Obama says the United States will keep Iran from getting a nuclear weapon, but he will not engage in negotiations that go nowhere. Obama adds that "the clock is ticking."

On Saturday, the White House said it is prepared to talk one-on-one with Iran to find a diplomatic settlement to the impasse over Tehran's reported pursuit of nuclear weapons, but there's no agreement now to meet.

The New York Times reported that the U.S. and Iran have agreed in principle to negotiations. The White House denied that any such agreement had been reached.

DEBATE-ISRAEL-IRAN

NW: Obama: US will stand with Israel if it's attacked

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- President Barack Obama says the United States will stand with Israel if it's attacked.

Obama said during Monday's presidential debate that Iran will not get a nuclear weapon "as long as I'm president."

Republican challenger Mitt Romney says he'd push for diplomatic isolation of the country. He says Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad's rhetoric fans genocide and should be prosecuted under international law.

Obama says tough U.S. sanctions have "crippled" Iran's economy to the point that it's a shambles. The president says Iran is ultimately a threat to American national security and is a state sponsor of terrorism.

DEBATE-MILITARY SPENDING

NEW: Obama: Military spending not driven by politics

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- President Barack Obama says his military spending is "driven by strategy" not by politics.

The president is rejecting criticism from Republican Mitt Romney, who says Obama wants to cut the military by $1 trillion. Obama disputed that figure, but said spending needs to be based on the capabilities required by the military, not just budgets.

Obama accused Romney of calling for increases in military spending that the Pentagon doesn't want.

Romney says he would boost the number of naval ships because the U.S. fleet is the smallest since 1917. The president shot back, saying that was because technology has changed the nature of the military.

Romney said he would pay for increases in military spending by getting rid of Obama's health care overhaul and other programs he deems unnecessary.

DEBATE-DOMESTIC ISSUES

NEW: Foreign policy debate turns to US economy

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- Presidents Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney are shifting their debate on foreign policy toward domestic issues that are foremost on voters' minds.

Obama turned questions during Monday's third and final debate around and made them about jobs and the economy. Romney, too, pivoted from foreign policy questions to his five-point domestic agenda for jobs and the economy.

At one point, debate moderator Bob Schieffer seemed exasperated. "Let me get back to foreign policy," he pleaded.

Obama answered one foreign policy question by talking about his education initiatives and criticized Romney's tenure as Massachusetts governor.

Romney, too, detoured stateside. When asked about America's role in the world, he shifted the talk to college students who are graduating without jobs.

DEBATE-OBAMA

NEW: Obama aggressive in early minutes of debate

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- President Barack Obama is taking an aggressive posture toward rival Mitt Romney in Monday's debate, at one point saying the Republican's policy proposals are so outdated "the 1980s are now calling to ask for their foreign policy back."

The two sparred early in the debate moderated by CBS News anchor Bob Schieffer.

After Romney voiced concerns about the persistent threat of al-Qaida in the Middle East, Obama noted Romney had once called Russia the nation's gravest geopolitical threat.

Obama said Romney's policy positions were rooted in the 1980s and his views on social issues are rooted in the 1950s.

Romney said he wouldn't have "rose-colored glasses" toward Russian leader Vladimir Putin and chided Obama for suggesting he would have greater flexibility toward Russia after the election.

DEBATE-EXTREMISM

NEW: Romney: US can't kill way out of extremist threats

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- Republican Mitt Romney says he praises rival President Barack Obama for ordering the raid that killed al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden, but adds that the United States "can't kill our way out of this mess" of religious extremism.

Romney opened Monday's third and final presidential debate by criticizing Obama's policies toward Islamic extremism. He says that Obama missed an opportunity during the Arab Spring and says that Obama has not done enough to block Iran from building a nuclear weapon.

Obama says Romney has not been in a position to execute foreign policy, but adds that his positions to this point have "been all over the map." Romney says his strategy "is pretty straight forward: go after the bad guys."

DEBATE-SYRIA

NEW: Obama, Romney both oppose US troops in Syria

BOCA RATON, Fla. (AP) -- President Barack Obama and Republican Mitt Romney say they are both opposed to sending U.S. troops to Syria to end the violence there.

Obama says that while attacks by government forces against Syrian citizens is heartbreaking, getting the U.S. "entangled militarily" would be a serious step. Romney essentially agreed, saying he doesn't want the U.S. military involved in Syria.

Romney said the United States should be playing a leadership role in identifying responsible opposition groups in Syria and making sure they have the arms they need to fight President Bashar Assad's regime.

Obama says the U.S. is working with allies in the region to learn more about the opposition. But he says giving heavy weapons to those groups is not "a simple proposition."


FLORIDA (WIFR) -- Voters will get one last chance to compare President Obama with Governor Romney side by side. Tonight's debate is in Florida and the topic--foreign policy.

CBS' Bob Schieffer will ask questions on everything from China to Iran's nuclear ambitions. Campaign watchers usually give the advantage to the sitting president when debating international issues. For a different sort of analysis, tune in tonight at ten. Our body language expert Jim Zalad will join us to talk about some of the candidate's non-verbal cues.


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