UPDATE: States Urge Supreme Court to Take Up Gay Marriage

UPDATE: A rejection of same-sex marriage bans in Wisconsin and Indiana is bringing hope to those who

MGN Online

 32 states ask high court to settle gay marriage
   BOSTON (AP) -- More than 30 states have filed briefs asking the U.S. Supreme Court to rule on same-sex marriage.
   Massachusetts and 14 other states where same-sex marriage is legal filed a brief Thursday asking the justices to overturn other states' bans on gay marriage.
   Colorado and 16 other states that have banned same-sex marriage filed a separate brief asking the court to rule one way or the other to clear up a "morass" of lawsuits. Their brief doesn't specifically ask the court to uphold their bans.
   Massachusetts was joined by California, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Illinois, Iowa, Maine, Maryland, New Mexico, New York, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Vermont, and Washington.
   Colorado was joined by Alabama, Alaska, Arizona, Georgia, Idaho, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, West Virginia and Wisconsin.
 

MADISON, Wis. (AP) -- A rejection of same-sex marriage bans in Wisconsin and Indiana is bringing hope to those who've been fighting against the laws for years that the decision will add pressure to the Supreme Court to rule their way soon.

The decision from the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Chicago came Thursday, the same day 32 states asked the Supreme Court to settle the issue once and for all.

Celebrations over the latest legal victory for gay couples were tempered knowing that the bigger battle awaits.

Wisconsin Attorney General J.B. Van Hollen says he'll appeal the decision to the Supreme Court.

Meanwhile, 15 states that allow gay marriage asked the justices to overturn bans. And 17 other states with bans asked the court to clear up a "morass" of lawsuits.


CHICAGO (AP) -- A U.S. appeals court in Chicago has ruled that gay marriage bans in Wisconsin and Indiana are unconstitutional.

Thursday's decision by a three-judge panel at the U.S. 7th Circuit Court of Appeals bumps the number of states where gay marriage will be legal from 19 to 21. The decision was unanimous.

The Wisconsin and Indiana cases shifted to Chicago after their attorneys general appealed separate lower court rulings in June tossing the bans. The 7th Circuit stayed those rulings pending its own decision.

During oral arguments in August, one judge appointed by a Republican likened same-sex marriage bans to laws once barring interracial marriage. Judge Richard Posner said they derived from "hate ... and savage discrimination" of gays.

The states argued the prohibitions helped foster a centuries-old tradition.


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